pdf microbial esterase and the degradation of plasticizers

microbial esterase and the degradation of plasticizers

MICROBIAL ESTERASE AND THE DEGRADATION OF PLASTICIZERS

MICROBIAL ESTERASE AND THE DEGRADATION OF PLASTICIZERS Dominic Sauvageau1, Dr. David G. Cooper1, Dr. James A. Nicell2 1Departement of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 2Departement of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, McGill University 3610 University, Wong Building, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2B2, fax 514-398-6678, [email protected]

Contact Suppliers
pdf microbial esterase and the degradation of plasticizers

pdf microbial esterase and the degradation of plasticizers

factors influencing the degradation mechanisms of plasticizers and their long term impact on the environment. pdf microbial esterase and the degradation of

Contact Suppliers
(pdf) initial degradation of dimethylphthalate by esterases

(PDF) Initial degradation of dimethylphthalate by esterases

Purified bacterial esterase of 38 kDa is used in the study with optimised pH, temperature and T50 as 7.0, 40 °C and 65 °C. Microbial degradation is an important route for the breakdown of

Contact Suppliers
enhanced biodegradation of phthalic acid esters’ derivatives

Enhanced Biodegradation of Phthalic Acid Esters’ Derivatives

enzymes (esterase, carboxylesterase and hydratase) play a crucial role in the synergistic degradation of PAE plasticizers in microplastics [22]. Under di erent environmental conditions, microorganisms degrade the PAE plasticizers, but the degradation cycle is relatively long [23]. Therefore, it is of

Contact Suppliers
microbial capability for the degradation of chemical

Microbial capability for the degradation of chemical

This review describes the current knowledge and significant advances in the microbial degradation of plastic additives (i.e. plasticizers, flame retardants, stabilizers and antioxidants) and biotechnological research strategies that are being used to accelerate the biodegradation process of these additives.

Contact Suppliers
biodegradation of structurally diverse phthalate esters by a

Biodegradation of Structurally Diverse Phthalate Esters by a

A bacterial esterase converting structurally the key role of synergistic microbial networks in removing plasticizer di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate from estuarine sediments. mSystems 6:e00358-21

Contact Suppliers
degradation of a plasticizer, di-n-butylphthalate by delftia

Degradation of a Plasticizer, di-n-Butylphthalate by Delftia

A bacterial strain Delftia sp. TBKNP-05 isolated by para-hydroxybenzoate enrichment technique is capable of degrading di-n-butylphthalate (DBP) as a sole source of carbon and energy. Analysis of intermediates by thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography indicated the presence of monobutylphthalate (MBP), phthalate (PA), and protocatechuate (PCA). The washed cells

Contact Suppliers
enhanced biodegradation of phthalic acid esters’ derivatives

Enhanced Biodegradation of Phthalic Acid Esters’ Derivatives

enzymes (esterase, carboxylesterase and hydratase) play a crucial role in the synergistic degradation of PAE plasticizers in microplastics [22]. Under di erent environmental conditions, microorganisms degrade the PAE plasticizers, but the degradation cycle is relatively long [23]. Therefore, it is of

Contact Suppliers
bacteria-mediated phthalic acid esters degradation and

Bacteria-mediated phthalic acid esters degradation and

Many PAEs-degrading bacteria were isolated, metabolites and metabolic pathways were proposed, and enzymes involved in the degradation were identified. The current paper presents an overview of available reports about PAEs-degrading bacteria and related molecular mechanisms.

Contact Suppliers
7. microbial biodegradation of polyurethane

7. Microbial biodegradation of polyurethane

biodegradation by naturally occurring microorganisms. Microbial degradation of PU is dependent on the many properties of the polymer such as molecular orientation, crystallinity, cross-linking and chemical groups present in the molecular chains which determine the accessibility to degrading-enzyme systems.

Contact Suppliers
microbial capability for the degradation of chemical

Microbial capability for the degradation of chemical

This review describes the current knowledge and significant advances in the microbial degradation of plastic additives (i.e. plasticizers, flame retardants, stabilizers and antioxidants) and biotechnological research strategies that are being used to accelerate the biodegradation process of these additives.

Contact Suppliers
microbial degradation of microplastics by enzymatic processes

Microbial degradation of microplastics by enzymatic processes

Research on microplastic degradation is focused on biological and non-biological approaches. To date, microorganisms such as algae, fungi, and bacteria have attracted the attention of scientists as a tool for microplastic treatment. The degradation of microplastics is closely related to the enzymatic reactions produced by the microorganisms.

Contact Suppliers
(pdf) review on microbial carboxylesterase: general

(PDF) Review on microbial carboxylesterase: general

A family VIII esterase DLFae4 was found to contain a typical serine residue within the S-X-X-K motif, which serves as a catalytic nucleophile in class C β-lactamases and family VIII esterases.

Contact Suppliers
pdf the influence of polystyrene modifier and plasticizer

pdf the influence of polystyrene modifier and plasticizer

The Influence of Polystyrene Modifier and Plasticizer Nature on the Properties 201 using DBP. In the case of DEHP these values are less (2 wt %). The compositio

Contact Suppliers
characterization and engineering of a plastic-degrading

Characterization and engineering of a plastic-degrading

PETase catalyzes the depolymerization of PET to bis (2-hydroxyethyl)-TPA (BHET), MHET, and TPA. MHETase converts MHET to TPA and EG. Beyond PET, humankind uses a wide range of polyesters, broadly classified by aliphatic and aromatic content. PET, for example, is a semiaromatic polyester.

Contact Suppliers
role of microbes in degradation of synthetic plastics  - jocpr

Role of microbes in degradation of synthetic plastics - JOCPR

Plasticized polyvinyl chloride (pPVC) is vulnerable to microbial attack due to the presence of organic acid esters like dioctyl adipate (DOA) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP). Ester based plasticizers can be degraded by fungi and bacteria. If pPVC loses plasticizers because of microbial degradation, it leads to its failure [4].

Contact Suppliers
7. microbial biodegradation of polyurethane

7. Microbial biodegradation of polyurethane

biodegradation by naturally occurring microorganisms. Microbial degradation of PU is dependent on the many properties of the polymer such as molecular orientation, crystallinity, cross-linking and chemical groups present in the molecular chains which determine the accessibility to degrading-enzyme systems.

Contact Suppliers
(pdf) microbial degradation of organophosphorus compounds

(PDF) Microbial degradation of organophosphorus compounds

MPA is also susceptible to C-P lyase producing bacteria (Zhang et al., 1999). Use of MPA as a source of phosphorus by a P. putida has been observed (Cook et al., 1978b). Several other bacteria were reported to possess C-P lyases and they have been described for glyphosate degradation. The microbial degradation pathway for GB is presented in Fig. 9.

Contact Suppliers
microbial degradation of complex carbohydrates in the gut

Microbial degradation of complex carbohydrates in the gut

Metabolic cross-feeding is a central feature in anaerobic microbial communities that involves products of fermentation such as hydrogen and lactate as well as partial substrate degradation products. 13, 14 On the other hand, many other dominant gut bacteria show remarkable nutritional flexibility.

Contact Suppliers
gut microbial degradation of organophosphate insecticides

Gut microbial degradation of organophosphate insecticides

A similar trend was observed in esterase activity (Fig. 4d) and this indicates that byproducts of OP degradation are able to induce glucose intolerance but the modified microbiome with degrading potential lacks this property. Though the microbes in cellular suspension have OP metabolizing potential, they do not have the substrate OPs to produce

Contact Suppliers
initial degradation of dimethylphthalate by esterases from

Initial degradation of dimethylphthalate by esterases from

The isoesterases Et‐1–4 were absent in the cell‐free extracts of the cured bacterium. The results from our studies clearly demonstrate that de‐esterification is the initial step in the degradation of DMP and the genes for these esterases seem to be harbored on the plasmid in this bacterium.

Contact Suppliers
frontiers | together is better: the rumen microbial community

Frontiers | Together Is Better: The Rumen Microbial Community

Microorganisms, like bacteria and fungi, are becoming an emerging resource for the development of eco-sustainable plastic degradation and recycling processes. In this study, the rumen content from cattle (Bos taurus) was investigated regarding synthetic polyester hydrolyzing enzymes based on the fact that the diet of ruminants may contain natural plant polyesters.

Contact Suppliers
characterization and engineering of a plastic-degrading

Characterization and engineering of a plastic-degrading

PETase catalyzes the depolymerization of PET to bis (2-hydroxyethyl)-TPA (BHET), MHET, and TPA. MHETase converts MHET to TPA and EG. Beyond PET, humankind uses a wide range of polyesters, broadly classified by aliphatic and aromatic content. PET, for example, is a semiaromatic polyester.

Contact Suppliers