antioxidants free full-text bioavailability of plant

antioxidants | free full-text | bioavailability of plant

Antioxidants | Free Full-Text | Bioavailability of Plant

Natural products with antioxidant properties have been extensively utilized in the pharmaceutical and food industry and have also been very popular as health-promoting herbal products. This review provides a summary of the literature published around the first decade of the 21st century regarding the oral bioavailability of carotenoids, polyphenols and sulfur compounds as the three major

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antioxidants | free full-text | bioavailability of plant

Antioxidants | Free Full-Text | Bioavailability of Plant

Most plant polyphenols display significant antioxidant properties, mainly as free radical scavengers, which make them of interest for human therapeutics as potential chemopreventive agents and promoters of better health [ 57 ]. The bioavailability of polyphenolic compounds has been the subject of many recent reviews.

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antioxidants | free full-text | bioavailability of plant

Antioxidants | Free Full-Text | Bioavailability of Plant

Antioxidants, EISSN 2076-3921, Published by MDPI Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journal Antioxidants are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s).

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antioxidants | free full-text | plant phenolics

Antioxidants | Free Full-Text | Plant Phenolics

Phenolic compounds are secondary metabolites widely spread throughout the plant kingdom that can be categorized as flavonoids and non-flavonoids. Interest in phenolic compounds has dramatically increased during the last decade due to their biological effects and promising therapeutic applications. In this review, we discuss the importance of phenolic compounds’ bioavailability to

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antioxidants | free full-text | role of the encapsulation in

Antioxidants | Free Full-Text | Role of the Encapsulation in

Plant-derived phenolic compounds have multiple positive health effects for humans attributed to their antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor properties, etc. These effects strongly depend on their bioavailability in the organism. Bioaccessibility, and consequently bioavailability of phenolic compounds significantly depend on the structure and form in which they are introduced into the

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antioxidants | free full-text | plant feed additives as

Antioxidants | Free Full-Text | Plant Feed Additives as

In the last two decades, the interest in natural plant feed additives (PFA) as alternatives to synthetic vitamins in livestock nutrition has increased. After a systematic review, a total of 19 peer-reviewed papers published between 2000 and 2020 were retained to evaluate the antioxidant effects of PFA compared to synthetic antioxidant vitamins (mainly vitamin E; VitE) in livestock nutrition.

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antioxidants | free full-text | bioavailability of coenzyme

Antioxidants | Free Full-Text | Bioavailability of Coenzyme

A lack of understanding of the processes determining the absorption and subsequent metabolism of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has resulted in some manufacturers’ making incorrect claims regarding the bioavailability of their CoQ10 supplements, with potential consequences for the use of such products in clinical trials. The purpose of the present review article is, therefore, to describe the

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dietary intake and bioavailability of polyphenols | the

Dietary Intake and Bioavailability of Polyphenols | The

Several thousands of natural polyphenols have been identified in plants, many of them in plant foods (Shahidi and Naczk 1995), although only a more limited number are at significant levels in most human diets. The chemical structure of polyphenols will affect their biological properties: bioavailability, antioxidant activity, specific

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improvement of bioavailability of bioactive compounds of

Improvement of bioavailability of bioactive compounds of

Background: Medicinal and aromatic plants, which are rich sources of bioactive compounds, have been used in traditional medicine for ancient times. Epidemiological studies have shown that bioactive compounds of medicinal plants possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiatherosclerotic, antitumor, antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic, antibacterial and antiviral activities.

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curcumin: a review of its’ effects on human health

Curcumin: A Review of Its’ Effects on Human Health

Despite its reported benefits via inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms, one of the major problems with ingesting curcumin by itself is its poor bioavailability , which appears to be primarily due to poor absorption, rapid metabolism, and rapid elimination. Several agents have been tested to improve curcumin’s bioavailability by addressing

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a study on the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities in

A study on the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities in

Generally, plants include considerable extents of phytochemical antioxidants such as flavonoids, phenolics, carotenoids, and tannins, which can be utilized to scavenge the extra free radicals existing in the body . Many researches have reported the antioxidant effect of essential oils and plant extracts.

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phenolic compounds as antidiabetic, anti‐inflammatory, and

Phenolic compounds as antidiabetic, anti‐inflammatory, and

Request full-text PDF. Such bioactive substances are responsible for the plant's antioxidant and medicinal values. The bioavailability of hydrophobic bioactives can be improved using

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